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20121224
20121224
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Book TV 10
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CSPAN2 10
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English 10
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 6:45am EST
again to be i knew i had to put everything aside and write it. >> you're a law professor correct? so the courtroom drama part, did that come easy to? >> i don't know, for me no novel is really easy to write but it is true, this would fit into some of my interests as a scholar. i write about presidential power. i write about war. i've written a lot about lincoln over the years, and so taking that come those ideas, put them into fiction but if you think about it, lincoln did do things during the civil war that raise interesting questions. lincoln did suspend habeas corpus. in some cases subject to the military court-martial. my notion was what if a different process used for political reasons, nevertheless got us into the war as a way of trying to get them out of the way. >> how much political pressure was abraham lincoln under in early 1865? >> lincoln was the most talented politician i believe whoever inhabited the -- not the oval office. there was a one, but the presidential office at the time. he had to balance these competing factions of his own party. he had to run the civil war
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:00pm EST
as a nigger or black people as niggers may be in violation ofhe law creating a hostile workplac and thereby making yourself t subject to liability under thetl 1964e call or under the civil-rights law of 1964. so, under certain circumstancess you can would make yourself -- which subjects yourself to legal liability, or another way. if you commit violence and in the indication of a -- the commission of a violent act refer to people using the n-word, you might be subject to hate law legislation, and thereby not only be prosecuted for assault or whatever violent act you have committed, but you might subject yourself to an enhanced penalty by running afoul of state hate laws. so, under certain circumstances, yeah, you would be in violation of the law. generally speaking, though, because of the strong shielding power of the first amendment, people, for instance, comedians or writers, can use the n-word and not have to fear the law, though you might have to fear a public opinion which itself can be a very powerful force. >> host: is that the near word versus citing word? >> host: the law of homici
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:00am EST
with legislation with the civil-rights act was enacted into law the. >>host: at what point* did you become aware of the civil-rights commission? >>guest: i became aware when i was in a graduate program they would ask me if i would in the '60s and '70s. they were very good reports. i was very much aware. and the commission asked me to ask if i would write something with abortion rights and let history had been and i did a report for them. >>host: what is your history? >> what to stage where you from? >> i am from asheville my family and their relatives are there. when i went to howard university for seven to the history department with a ph.d. then to the law school to do legal history. then you had to get both degrees but not at the same time. but now that you can. [laughter] i had to do one then the other. >>host: did you come north to graduate school on purpose. >>guest: howard. absolutely. with those negros is we were called i went to howard. that made sense but one of the first to announce that was black in the ph.d. program. they said they were surprised to see me. onetime bay negro came ye
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 11:00pm EST
service of the mine which is illegal by the way under the u.s. law. they were busted by the clinton administration, stripped of insurance, but they have henry kissinger on the door, so they got everything worked out. this has 18,000 people working at 15,000 feet. straight down through glacier. it's the biggest gold mine and basically the biggest cotton - the world. but, people are shocked. there's a huge battle going on because they're putting 300,000 tons of waste every single day in the two rivers without, like in america you can't do that. but there you just play with on and it doesn't matter. so, what you are asking is to be pushed off and if you do you push it puts a to china who doesn't care. yeah it's much worse. at the bottom line is america is actually good about mining in terms of world standards we have the highest standards really of safety the you are talking about huge amounts of toxic metals that they admittedly don't know how to control. it is in the they don't want to be and i do not think they are evil by nature they just don't know how to do at. in arizona may be
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:00am EST
. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really does three from 1964 to two dozen eight could be thought of as kind of the carried of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year perio
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:30am EST
of the arizona law that's derided by some as the papers, please, law. and he's against the original dream act. and so those are positions that he will be pressed about as his national profile rises and that he'll have to reconcile if he wants to scoop up a whole lot of hispanic votes and bring them to the republican party. >> host: mr. roig-franzia, the mormon aspect of marco rubio's childhood, what did you discover about that, and can you walk us through that? >> guest: it's so interesting that he has a mormon background at all. and when he was being talked about as a possible vice presidential candidate, some people were saying, wow, could it be an all-mormon ticket? because mitt romney was mormon. that's a little bit of an overgeneralization there. here's the situation. marco rubio was born catholic, grew up in miami, and his family moved to las vegas. they moved to las vegas because he had an aunt and uncle who lived there. his mother's sister. and this is a pattern that we see with immigrants. they follow tear family members -- their family members, right? so it was logical when they wer
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:15am EST
be the network of a law firm that perhaps, you know, only spans from new york to los angeles. it might be a network like facebook or google. but what's striking and necessary to understand the way it manifests itself physically is that networks carry networks. you might have a global backbone company like a level three or a tata that own the strands of glass and that own the conduits that might run perhaps beside railroad tracks across the country. you might have another company, sort of a mid-sized network services company, one called hurricane electric, that might actually illuminate those strands of glass. they might own the light. ask and then you might have a goldman sachs or large law firm that buys bandwidth on that glass. so it's, you know, we often talk about b the information superhighway as if the network itself were the highway. i hike to think of it more -- i like to think of it more that a given network is a car chugging along the highway side by side with other networks because there's definitely a layering going on that's crucial to understanding the way in which the ne
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 5:00pm EST
of family life so that the rest of us can feel safe. my son-in-law is currently on the pace of deployment and my daughter in the special operations and my heroes. fear is part of their everyday. although my name is in writing this chapter in the book i cannot take all the credit. i was still so broken at the time i was asked to write in a difficult expressing myself. there is input for my husband, gary, matthews wife theresa who was his high school sweetheart and worked with him on the student council and his naval academy friends. matthews story would not have been written without their input and i deeply thank them for all of their input. this book, "in the shadow of greatness" will help america to better understand the sacrificey and the courage of the brave men and women in the families of the greatest military force in the world. freedom is not free. god bless our military families in god bless america. [applause] [applause] [applause] >> thank you ,-com,-com ma lisa. thank you mrs. freeman. war brings sorrow and weakness, but through the challengechallenge s we face over the past 10
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 10:00am EST
causes people to drive more. there's something called the fundamental law of traffic congestion that establishes that vehicle miles traveled increase roughly one for one with highway miles built. if you build it, they will drive, okay? the only way to make sure that our city streets are moved sufficiently is to charge people for it, to actually do what singapore does, second densest country in the world, and yet you can drive around it effortlylessly because they have that electronic road pricing thing that charges you for using these streets. america's cities are running, essentially, a soviet-style urban transit policy. they used to have grocery stores that would give away eggs and butter at far below market prices, the result was you couldn't get the goods. that's what we do with our city streets. they're a valuable commodity, and as a result, they're the urban equivalent of long lines which are traffic jams. there's no path other than actually making people pay for the cost of their actions. now, we already, of course, pay plenty, and one of the enduring challenges of cities
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:30pm EST
. president laws of the clinton global the initiative announcing a major new direction on this topic and there are many people that work on this topic to have helped move it forward on the agenda but one of them as a lot of credit. >> we've been talking with philip auerswald, the coming prosperity, entrepreneurs are transforming the global economy. his most recent book. book tv on location at george mason university. >>> now on book tv, alex berezow argues that while antiscience is usually a term associated with conservatives, the left in the united states has plenty of problems with science when it comes to issues they don't support. it's about an hour and a half. >> my name is kenneth agreement and a resident scholar here at the enterprise institute and i work on primarily energy and environmental policy issues. i'm a scientist as well as alex and my doctoral degree is environmental science and engineering. so i am really excited to have this event today on science called "science left behind," alex's great book, and before we start, if i seem a little fuzzy you've seen the commerc
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10